‘Waiting on the Lord’ – Recording Finished

Blogging here on the fly – nothing pre meditated – Just finished recording all the audio for my new solo guitar album “Waiting on the Lord” – I am so overjoyed!

I originally set off recording the album as solo electronic record. It was to be a testimony album; portraying the current season my wife and I are in – both of us out of college, trying to get both our careers started, move into a new home and stand on our own two feet so-to-say, all while deepening our relationship with each other and our heavenly Father as we look Him to move mountains.

With problems in the recording & performance process – dealing with equipment and software that was both too unpredictable and unreliable – I set off to re-work the album for solo electric guitar & loop machine.

I dug into the capabilities & idiosyncrasies of using delay and loop machines dynamically with distortion in a minimalist manner making the most of musical motifs, layering, and compositional shape. Using only notes on staff paper and rough-sketch recordings, I composed and recorded the album over the course of Spring & Summer 2012, both loving the project, and hating the whole process at the same time. The result is a very real & organic soul-bearing solo guitar album. No multitracking; only piecing different sections of composition together at it’s most technical aspects; if not recording the whole song in a single take.

Waiting on the Lord is now in the process of a very minimal editing & mixing process to maintain its authenticity & minimalist nature and will be available in the rather near future.

Waiting on the Lord – 2012

  1. pushing for a new season
  2. waiting on the Lord
  3. defining moments
  4. God move!
  5. things unseen
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Free Circa 2007 Digital Download | Progressing Deviation

FREE MUSIC! 

The 2007 debut release Progressing Deviation is now available for free digital download on NoiseTrade.com For those of you who have had the joy of listening to More Than Ever – it’s truly like a prequel with several killer tracks and some epic compositions and aggressive guitar work all-around.

ALSO 

An exclusive from the studio, “Defining Moments” (alternate take 1) from the Waiting on the Lord solo guitar album also available for free digital download on NoiseTrade.com, as well!

These are rather exclusive and can/will be taken down at anytime as other recordings become available! Go Download & Enjoy!

For the Glory of it All

Triángulo de Pascal en el escrito original de ...

Triángulo de Pascal en el escrito original de Pascal (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Our DNA sequence doesn’t have a key signature. The fibonacci series isn’t in 4/4. So – why should our worship music be limited by such rules?

Our congregations aren’t as dumb as our worship music makes them out to be.

I’m sure God could’ve made these essentials a lot simpler in life – but where would His glory and extravagance in that?  It’s as if this whole contemporary worship thing thrives on the upmost simplicity & gets away with it so much that

Description: A typical Sunday morning worship ...

Description: A typical Sunday morning worship time in the main venue, Building A Photographer: David Ball Date: July 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

we’ve stopped challenging ourselves to creative something ornate and beautiful for the King.

What can we do to make our music more ornate – rhythmically – harmonically – instrumentally – to make use of our God given creativity – but remain accessible to our congregations? Let’s move forward.

When the King returns – we should be in the fields workings – not copying and pasting.

5 Tips to Make Your Worship Band Awesome Without Being a Virtuoso

1. Record Yourselves!

Audio levels shown on a Zoom H4n while recordi...

Audio levels shown on a Zoom H4n while recording Deutsch: Lautstärkeanzeige des Zoom H4n bei der Tonaufnahme (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

That which is most painful will be most effective. The audio recorder doesn’t lie. You’ll hear

the tempo shift, missed notes, things musically that you think work..but actually don’t. It’s all there. Set an audio recorder in the front row (discreetly on a pew if you wanted) or even plugged into the mixing board. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, but this will help you identify and fix numerous problems.

2. Rehearse! …

And not just before church either. Things need time to sink in; sleep on it and come back. And while everyone in the worship band has day jobs, it can be tough to schedule an evening once a week. But don’t forget, this is for the King of Kings! It’s a tithe of time, and not even 10% of your week!

3. Worship Bands Have Layers!

The praise and worship band is the symphony orchestra of the protestant church. Only at the climax of a composition should the whole orchestra be playing. And while that’s not completely true for the worship band, still the point is to know when and when not to play. Just because you have 7, 23, or 2 members, doesn’t mean you should be playing at the same time. Also; Playing something simple is often more effective than a flurry of notes (that’s you, guitar players!) Listen to what’s going on around you and play accordingly. …which brings me to my next point…

4. Where’s the Climax?

My composition professor would always ask this whenever I brought in a new composition for review “Where’s the climax…circle it!”As a band, identify where the climax of each song is and what each of you are playing at that point. From there, you can decide what and what not to play | who will and will not be playing when? Listen to some of your favorite songs.. ask yourself “Where is the climax?” You’ll be surprised with what you find. When you’re able to dynamically and instrumentally shape a song as a band, then will you sound tight and together; you will see the congregation respond.

5. Sing For Me a New Song

Whether or not you’re deciding to meet for rehearsals or not, this is an excellent opportunity for the band to come together and make something ‘their own.’ You’re already familiar with lead sheets (the words with the chords over them), so why not type up your own if you feel the calling. Present it to the worship leader if you’re a band member; to pastor if you’re the worship leader. Present it to the band and be creative! It’s a new way to signify to the congregation that good things are happening in your place of worship.

 

New Sounds: Utilizing the Vocoder in Worship

Even though my degree from university technically says ‘Bachelor of Music in Music Theory & Composition,’ I actually studied Electronic Music Composition – so – I’m a total nerd when it coems to LFO’s, filters, sampling, and automation.  So naturally I’m attracted to new sounds besides the standard piano, strings, and organ most factory keyboards are furnished with.

With that being said, making your worship music texture new with the use of a vocoder can be a great change from the norm under 2 conditions

  1. Use the vocoder sparingly; it can get real old real quick if done too much
  2. Never ask for permission – always ask for forgiveness

Most traditional worship leaders won’t be for something so “new” instrumentally or texture-wise – so practice with the sound (whether its the vocoder or a completely new sound) in the sanctuary before or after the service for kicks.  Additionally, definitely rehearse a song by yourself at home to make sure you can easily & smoothly change chords with the vocoder while singing before implementing it into the service.  If you’re working with a new original tonal sound or effect – make sure you’re not going to run into any resonance or distortion issues. Above all – be respectful to your worship team & congregation.  If you see something isn’t going to work – don’t force it. Take time in crafting your sounds and samples. You want to add to worship – not take away from it.

Below is an example of the song “Facedown” by Matt Redman with a vocoder texture higher in the mix.   Happy Vocoding!